If you need assistance, please call 502-264-1908

Coaches Don't Play the Field

Monday, October 8, 2018   /   by Drew Wisdom

Coaches Don't Play the Field

As someone who coaches multiple people on our team (and having done so for a while now), I thought I had coaching figured out. I thought I knew how to push different people in different ways to help them be the best that they could be. Well, I went to a coaching camp that Keller Williams offers (number 1 training company in the world, remember?), I found out that I was SORELY mistaken. The takeaways at that camp were in the hundreds; and no, I won’t talk about everything I learned. There was one lesson that stood out more than any other one though, and that lesson is one that I will take with me no matter where I go and what I do. It’s a lesson that can be applied ANYWHERE! The lesson: coaches don’t play the field. When you first hear it, it’s like DUH! They’re the coach?! And, when you start to dissect it and analyze the statement you realize that it’s arguably the most important piece of coaching. To understand why this is so important we need to understand what the purpose of coaching is. Everyone has their own definition of it. Whether it is to win the “game”, to improve the other person, or to help someone overcome their weaknesses is irrelevant. To me, coaching can be summed up in one sentence: to help someone realize and then achieve their full potential. It’s a coaches job to help point out “blind spots” and then to lead that person to self discovery of the solution to the problem. Notice that last line: SELF DISCOVERY of the solution to the problem. That is why this lesson hit me so hard. As a coach I have a tendency to push people, and to make them uncomfortable because when people are uncomfortable that’s when they are growing. What I also have a tendency to do is give them my solution to the problem or struggle that they bring to me. Through this camp I learned that that is the WORST thing you can do to them! Yes, even worse than telling them they suck or are terrible. Why is it the worst? Because of a few different reasons. First off, you aren’t teaching them to find the solution themselves. You’re teaching them to ask you how to solve it; thus they will never really grow, they will just hope that YOU, the coach, grow. Not only are you teaching them to let you solve their problems, you are also limiting their potential. This is the piece that hit me like a truck. We, at WSG, believe in hiring people who will be better than ourselves. That means that everyone I’m currently coaching will be a better agent than me. However, that can’t happen if I limit their potential. How is that limiting their potential?? I’m so glad you asked!! It limits their potential because by giving them the solution, I am placing MY potential on them. Whereas, if I keep pushing and asking questions about how THEY would solve the problem they could come up with a much better idea than me! By giving them the answer though, I am doing them such a disservice (and the team a disservice too because we then miss out on a potentially groundbreaking idea). A great coach brings out the person’s full potential, and until recently I was coaching a bunch of mini Drew’s because I would provide them with the solution. Now, I am happy to report there is only one Drew, and a group of people who will be so much better than him. I don’t think the world could handle more than 1 Drew anyways... ;)